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What is the London 11+ Consortium?

In 2022 the Consortium introduced a new bespoke assessment process, for entry in September 2023 onwards, which goes beyond testing cognitive ability alone and seeks to discover a child’s potential in creative and critical thinking, analysis, synthesis and problem-solving. This test is 100 minutes in total and taken in the candidate’s current school, but where this is not possible, provision is made in all Consortium schools for candidates to sit the test there. Previously known as the North London Girls’ Schools’ Consortium, this is a group of independent London girls’ schools that came together to essentially reduce the pressure on girls at the 11+ entrance examination stage. Rather than sitting multiple exams, there is only one exam whether you are applying to one or more of the schools. The following schools are part of The London 11+ Consortium:

Channing School

Francis Holland School, Regent’s Park

Francis Holland School, Sloane Square

The Godolphin and Latymer School

More House School

Northwood College for Girls

Nottinghill and Ealing High School

Queen’s College London

Queen’s Gate School

South Hampstead High School

St Augustine’s Priory

St. Helen’s School London

St. James Senior Girls’ School

St Margaret’s School

What does the London 11+ Consortium assessment involve?

For 2023 entry, the London 11+ Consortium writes, “In 2022 the Consortium introduced a new bespoke assessment process, for entry in September 2023 onwards, which goes beyond testing cognitive ability alone and seeks to discover a child’s potential in creative and critical thinking, analysis, synthesis and problem-solving. This test is 100 minutes in total and taken in the candidate’s current school, but where this is not possible, provision is made in all Consortium schools for candidates to sit the test there.”  The London 11+ Consortium have issued familiarisation materials which can be found here. There may also be an interview as part of the process.

Where does your child take the assessment?

The exam is taken in the candidate’s current school, but if this is not possible, provision is made in all Consortium schools for candidates to sit the test there.

 

What can children do to prepare for the assessment and how can Bright Light Education help? 

Below we advise some different ideas on how to prepare for each section of the assessment and how Bright Light Education can help.

Preparation for the verbal ability questions

  • Vocabulary plays an important role in these types of question so the best preparation you can do is to increase and broaden your child’s vocabulary. Have a look at our blog post on this here.

Preparation for the numerical ability questions

  • These are essentially maths questions! To help with these types of question, it is important that children have the core basic skills including knowing their times tables well. They should be confident with the Key Stage 2 syllabus.

Preparation for the non-verbal ability questions

  • Non-verbal reasoning can be practised and the more familiar children are with the different strategies used in non-verbal reasoning, the easier it becomes. There are lots of non-verbal reasoning books you can buy which cover the different concepts, including identifying the odd shape out, rotating shapes, mirror images of shapes, working out the next shape in a sequence etc.

Preparation for the interview process

For full comprehensive information, please visit The London 11+ Consortium.

 

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